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LIBRARY TALK – FEBRUARY 28, 2019

Cookbooks—fun to read, and if you are lucky, you find some true ‘keeper’ recipes! Yes, there are lots of recipes online, and you can even type in some of the ingredients you have lying around to find a last minute dish, but to me, sitting down with a cookbook, especially if it has ‘commentary’ is more interesting if you have the time.

We’ve currently added the following:

Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen by Sean Sherman.  I’ve read several glowing reviews of this book, but still wondered if it had a place here. Then, in a book just added about the current issues of Native Americans, this author and book were brought up again, and I was curious, so we now have it in our collection.  While I haven’t cooked anything from the book yet, it is a good read—a bit of the author’s childhood, his searches for authentic food and stories, and lots of recipes. Some ingredients might prove difficult to find, but many are available, including some wild material that would be easily found in this area.

Local cookbooks are always welcome in our collection, and the United Methodist Women from the Centenary United Methodist Church here in Ripley have put together a cookbook in celebration of their bicentennial. Fun to see who contributed as well as seeing traditional and  new recipes to try.

Last cookbook for the column is one put out by America’s Test Kitchen titled Cook’s Illustrated All Time Best Brunch. Of course the classic eggy casseroles, variations on waffles, pancakes, muffins, salads, biscuits, scones and more. What sets a ‘Test Kitchen’ book apart from other cookbooks is the short explanation as to why a technique or an ingredient works. If you’ve watched the series, you will be familiar with the ‘why the recipe works’ concept. Pretty pictures don’t hurt the book either.

Of course, we have many old and new, diet and ‘bad for you’, comfort and exotic cookbooks at all of our libraries, as well as access to hundreds, probably thousands more.  They are here for you to browse and read, and maybe even find a new family favorite.

Matthew